Consultation

A consultation gives you the opportunity to speak with an experienced immigration attorney one-on-one and gives the attorney a better understanding of your case. The attorney will advise what options are available and recommend the best strategy for your situation. During the consultation the attorney will also provide you with a fee quote and application time-line. There is no time limit for the consultation; however, it generally lasts between 30 and 60 minutes. Our staff consists of Spanish and French speakers, and arrangements can be made with  translators of other languages as well.

To schedule a consultation, please contact us.

 

How much does a consultation cost?

The consultation fee is $300.00 (as of May 1, 2016), and payment is collected prior to meeting with the attorney. We accept cash, personal check, money order, and credit cards (Visa, Mastercard, Discover). This consultation fee will be deducted from the retainer fee if you retain our office within 30 days of your consultation.

 

When and where does the consultation take place? 

Consultations can be scheduled Monday through Friday between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Arrangements may be made for consultations at earlier or later times upon request. Consultations are held in our office located at:  2011 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 500 Washington, D.C. 20006.

You may also schedule a telephone consultation if necessary. Please note that we are available for consultations via Skype. Our username is bromberglaw — you can add us by clicking the Skype button at the bottom of this page.

 

What documents do I need to bring to my consultation?

You should bring any documentation that is relevant to your case, especially any U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) or Department of Homeland Security (DHS) documentation, including court summons. Also, if you have access to personal identification and financial documents, it would be helpful to bring those as well. These documents include:

  • Birth, marriage, and/or death certificates
  • Passports, driver’s licenses and/or ID cards
  • Financial and/or tax information
  • Work and residence history
  • Documentation of entering the U.S.